EASTON FOUNDATION IN THE NEWS

Top Ranked Compound Bow Archer Sets Sights On Recurve For 2020 Olympics

By: Perry Smith

Crystal Gauvin had a successful career she enjoyed as a senior economist, and then she discovered archery.

Her story contains a combination of factors—parts dedication, drive, passion, planning, practice, and sacrifice—as her voyage to the No. 2 ranked archer in the world (No. 1 in the United States), includes her forgoing the steady career, for a shot at being right where she stands today. And when she reached the top of the compound bow world, she changed again.

Crystal received her first compound bow as a Christmas present in 2012, but even that’s a bit of an unusual start for a world class competitor. At first, her family and friends discouraged the choice, and pushed her toward the recurve bow. “They wouldn’t let me shoot with a compound bow,” she recalled. “Here in New England, because of (five-time Olympian) Butch Johnson, it was all recurve, recurve, recurve. Nobody shoots compound.”

She made a bet with her husband and some of her friends from the local archery range—if she entered a local competition and won, she could shoot all the compound bow she desired. Using an old hunting bow sans the stabilizer and target sights commonplace in competitions, she took first. In fact, she won by about 100 points.

The family’s hesitation was understandable. Hailing from the Northeast, a region that produced Olympians and renowned coaches, including Butch Johnson, Roxanne Reimann and Karen Scavotto among others, considered to be among the best in recurve, Gauvin’s choice is all the more unique. Most archers in the area shoot with a recurve, which Gauvin attributed to a few factors, namely the large shadows cast by the success of the aforementioned greats. But her family became staunch supporters, and with her yuletide gift of a target bow, she was ready. Or so she thought.  “And I kind of just took off, from there,” she said, “and got my butt handed to me at the Lancaster Classic.”

Her first “real” tournament—the Pennsylvania competition in late January 2013 that, over the last quarter-century, brings together some of the best archers in the world—gave her an education in how much she had to learn, she said. For example, her finishing out of the top-16 for the first time ended up being a blessing in disguise—she hadn’t brought enough arrows to compete had she made the cut. “Make sure you read the rules for every archery tournament,” she said, sharing the lesson that the experience taught her. “Every tournament can have a different format.”

The loss became a turning point for her. The early elimination kindled her competitive nature.

She was shooting alongside some of the nation’s best, and started to soak up all she could: the importance of knowing how to fix problems with your equipment, the need for consistent training, and so on. By the end of the year, she set her sights on making the national team in 2014. After the first year, she ended up on the podium at more than two-thirds of her tournaments in 2014, and then the following year, she earned a spot on the U.S. World Cup team.

“There’s definitely a big learning curve,” she said, noting things like the first time she shot outdoors, for the Arizona Cup, early in the season, and how wind could affect her shot.

All of this and others were teaching moments that she still takes with her, and shares with the athletes she coaches.

Despite her success, the industry and Olympic opportunity with the recurve bow recently pushed her to pick up the more traditional competition bow, and she’s now set her sights, so to speak, on the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. This year, her goal is a learning year, albeit one with aggressive goals, as she gets the hang of recurve.

For the athlete who was essentially oblivious to international archery competition until the London Olympics—she said she trained under Butch Johnson for months before discovering his Olympic past—Gauvin is now clearly in the same league as archery’s best. And while she knows the leap from competitive to elite is difficult, it would probably be unwise to bet against her at this point.  “Ultimately, the primary goal is to learn as much as I can so I can be 100 percent ready to be competitive for next year,” she said.

Outdoor Discovery Center Macatawa Greenway opens new archery facility with the help of funding from the Easton Foundations

 February 14, 2017

Thank you again very much for the Easton Foundations support in 2015 to help with the construction of our new archery facility. We wanted to update you on the success of the program.   The facility now has 15 Olympic size lanes, a needed drainage pond, fencing, berm, bow hangers, and bleachers.   Many individuals have enjoyed the new facility and it has sparked a great deal of interest in our organizational membership.

Prior to the receipt of our grant in 2015, about 300 children participated in Archery programs at the Outdoor Discovery Center Macatawa Greenway (ODCMG).   However, following the upgrades to the archery facility, that number grew to more than 500. Within the next year, we see continued growth to 750 individuals participating in archery through clubs, programs, lessons, and summer camps.

Archery is a very important part of our organization and serves as a key way to teach children and adults about the conservation of our native environment through hunting.   Adults and children love taking pride in their skills in archery developing over time and it gives them a sense of confidence as they become better at this sport. We are thankful for your support to grow these programs through the building of the facility and the beauty and uniqueness it provides to our nature preserve.

Thank you for your generosity in the past and for continuing a relationship with the ODCMG.

Sincerely,

David Nyitray

Development Director

Outdoor Discovery Center Macatawa Greenway (ODCMG)

EASTON FOUNDATIONS VAN NUYS ARCHERY CENTER TO CLOSE

Van Nuys, CA
December 14, 2016

After much consideration, the Easton Foundations has decided to discontinue its archery program at the Easton Van Nuys Archery Center. The archery center, located at 15026 Oxnard Street, Van Nuys, CA will close permanently on Wednesday, February 1, 2017.

According to Caren Sawyer, Executive Director, the Easton Foundations’ headquarters will remain in this location after the closure, but will likely move to another location in 2017. The Foundation will also continue to operate its three state-of-the-art facilities in Chula Vista, Calif., Salt Lake City, Utah, and Newberry, Fla.

Easton Foundations’ President, Greg Easton stated, “While the Easton Foundations have streamlined our programs and operations, we remain committed to serve the sport of archery, and to implement our mission the way Jim Easton has envisioned.”

Thank you for supporting the Easton Foundations. We count on your support as we move forward in 2017 to continue to increase awareness of archery and its impact in the United States and across the globe.

Bridgestone Americas, Inc. Makes Donation to the Easton Sports Development Foundation

Bridgestone Americas made financial donations to six organizations on behalf of “Team Bridgestone” featuring Aly Raisman, Meb Keflezighi, Kelley O’Hara, Cullen Jones, Will Groulx, and our beloved Khatuna Lorig. The support is part of Bridgestone’s “Behind the Performance” program, which is designed to celebrate each Team Bridgestone athlete’s relentless passion for performance and honor those who helped inspire and support their Olympic journey.

Each member of Team Bridgestone selected an organization to receive a $10,000 donation from Bridgestone. ESDF was lucky enough to be selected by Khatuna for this generous donation. Thank you so much to Bridgestone and Khatuna for this gracious gift! We appreciate it so much.

Read more:  https://www.bridgestoneamericas.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2016/bridgestone-supporting-six-organizations-personally-selected-by-olympic-and-paralympic-athletes

 

Shooting Sports Fest at Georgia Southern University

gsu-oct-2016

GSU had a great turnout for their Shooting Sports Fest with over 800 people attending.  They had archery activities which included ‘Try Archery’ for all ages, shooting at a target about 5 meters, 3-D archery outside for all ages as well as the Hover archery system supplied by the Georgia DNR & Fellowship of Christian Athletes Shooting Sports.

Click here to view the video

 

 

 

 

The Easton Archery Center of Excellence receives award from the City of Chula Vista

Don Rabska, VP of the Easton Foundations with Mary Salas, the Mayor of Chula Vista
Don Rabska, VP of the Easton Foundations receives award from Mary Salas, the Mayor of Chula Vista

The City of Chula Vista recognizes the Easton Archery Center of Excellence with the Ribbons & Shovels New Non-Residential Construction Project Award for architecture and design excellence in commercial, industrial, or retail projects that contribute to the economic vitality of Chula Vista.

It’s a Bullseye Again for UCLA Archery Festival

ucla2-sep-2016

Keep an eye out for Club Archery’s next event, the Bruin Indoor Tournament  at the Easton Van Nuys Archery Center on November 6th where they will compete against several other Southern California schools.

Kimberly Wang
President
UCLA Archery Club