EASTON FOUNDATION IN THE NEWS

Top Ranked Compound Bow Archer Sets Sights On Recurve For 2020 Olympics

By: Perry Smith

Crystal Gauvin had a successful career she enjoyed as a senior economist, and then she discovered archery.

Her story contains a combination of factors—parts dedication, drive, passion, planning, practice, and sacrifice—as her voyage to the No. 2 ranked archer in the world (No. 1 in the United States), includes her forgoing the steady career, for a shot at being right where she stands today. And when she reached the top of the compound bow world, she changed again.

Crystal received her first compound bow as a Christmas present in 2012, but even that’s a bit of an unusual start for a world class competitor. At first, her family and friends discouraged the choice, and pushed her toward the recurve bow. “They wouldn’t let me shoot with a compound bow,” she recalled. “Here in New England, because of (five-time Olympian) Butch Johnson, it was all recurve, recurve, recurve. Nobody shoots compound.”

She made a bet with her husband and some of her friends from the local archery range—if she entered a local competition and won, she could shoot all the compound bow she desired. Using an old hunting bow sans the stabilizer and target sights commonplace in competitions, she took first. In fact, she won by about 100 points.

The family’s hesitation was understandable. Hailing from the Northeast, a region that produced Olympians and renowned coaches, including Butch Johnson, Roxanne Reimann and Karen Scavotto among others, considered to be among the best in recurve, Gauvin’s choice is all the more unique. Most archers in the area shoot with a recurve, which Gauvin attributed to a few factors, namely the large shadows cast by the success of the aforementioned greats. But her family became staunch supporters, and with her yuletide gift of a target bow, she was ready. Or so she thought.  “And I kind of just took off, from there,” she said, “and got my butt handed to me at the Lancaster Classic.”

Her first “real” tournament—the Pennsylvania competition in late January 2013 that, over the last quarter-century, brings together some of the best archers in the world—gave her an education in how much she had to learn, she said. For example, her finishing out of the top-16 for the first time ended up being a blessing in disguise—she hadn’t brought enough arrows to compete had she made the cut. “Make sure you read the rules for every archery tournament,” she said, sharing the lesson that the experience taught her. “Every tournament can have a different format.”

The loss became a turning point for her. The early elimination kindled her competitive nature.

She was shooting alongside some of the nation’s best, and started to soak up all she could: the importance of knowing how to fix problems with your equipment, the need for consistent training, and so on. By the end of the year, she set her sights on making the national team in 2014. After the first year, she ended up on the podium at more than two-thirds of her tournaments in 2014, and then the following year, she earned a spot on the U.S. World Cup team.

“There’s definitely a big learning curve,” she said, noting things like the first time she shot outdoors, for the Arizona Cup, early in the season, and how wind could affect her shot.

All of this and others were teaching moments that she still takes with her, and shares with the athletes she coaches.

Despite her success, the industry and Olympic opportunity with the recurve bow recently pushed her to pick up the more traditional competition bow, and she’s now set her sights, so to speak, on the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. This year, her goal is a learning year, albeit one with aggressive goals, as she gets the hang of recurve.

For the athlete who was essentially oblivious to international archery competition until the London Olympics—she said she trained under Butch Johnson for months before discovering his Olympic past—Gauvin is now clearly in the same league as archery’s best. And while she knows the leap from competitive to elite is difficult, it would probably be unwise to bet against her at this point.  “Ultimately, the primary goal is to learn as much as I can so I can be 100 percent ready to be competitive for next year,” she said.

Outdoor Discovery Center Macatawa Greenway opens new archery facility with the help of funding from the Easton Foundations

 February 14, 2017

Thank you again very much for the Easton Foundations support in 2015 to help with the construction of our new archery facility. We wanted to update you on the success of the program.   The facility now has 15 Olympic size lanes, a needed drainage pond, fencing, berm, bow hangers, and bleachers.   Many individuals have enjoyed the new facility and it has sparked a great deal of interest in our organizational membership.

Prior to the receipt of our grant in 2015, about 300 children participated in Archery programs at the Outdoor Discovery Center Macatawa Greenway (ODCMG).   However, following the upgrades to the archery facility, that number grew to more than 500. Within the next year, we see continued growth to 750 individuals participating in archery through clubs, programs, lessons, and summer camps.

Archery is a very important part of our organization and serves as a key way to teach children and adults about the conservation of our native environment through hunting.   Adults and children love taking pride in their skills in archery developing over time and it gives them a sense of confidence as they become better at this sport. We are thankful for your support to grow these programs through the building of the facility and the beauty and uniqueness it provides to our nature preserve.

Thank you for your generosity in the past and for continuing a relationship with the ODCMG.

Sincerely,

David Nyitray

Development Director

Outdoor Discovery Center Macatawa Greenway (ODCMG)

EASTON FOUNDATIONS VAN NUYS ARCHERY CENTER TO CLOSE

Van Nuys, CA
December 14, 2016

After much consideration, the Easton Foundations has decided to discontinue its archery program at the Easton Van Nuys Archery Center. The archery center, located at 15026 Oxnard Street, Van Nuys, CA will close permanently on Wednesday, February 1, 2017.

According to Caren Sawyer, Executive Director, the Easton Foundations’ headquarters will remain in this location after the closure, but will likely move to another location in 2017. The Foundation will also continue to operate its three state-of-the-art facilities in Chula Vista, Calif., Salt Lake City, Utah, and Newberry, Fla.

Easton Foundations’ President, Greg Easton stated, “While the Easton Foundations have streamlined our programs and operations, we remain committed to serve the sport of archery, and to implement our mission the way Jim Easton has envisioned.”

Thank you for supporting the Easton Foundations. We count on your support as we move forward in 2017 to continue to increase awareness of archery and its impact in the United States and across the globe.

Bridgestone Americas, Inc. Makes Donation to the Easton Sports Development Foundation

Bridgestone Americas made financial donations to six organizations on behalf of “Team Bridgestone” featuring Aly Raisman, Meb Keflezighi, Kelley O’Hara, Cullen Jones, Will Groulx, and our beloved Khatuna Lorig. The support is part of Bridgestone’s “Behind the Performance” program, which is designed to celebrate each Team Bridgestone athlete’s relentless passion for performance and honor those who helped inspire and support their Olympic journey.

Each member of Team Bridgestone selected an organization to receive a $10,000 donation from Bridgestone. ESDF was lucky enough to be selected by Khatuna for this generous donation. Thank you so much to Bridgestone and Khatuna for this gracious gift! We appreciate it so much.

Read more:  https://www.bridgestoneamericas.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2016/bridgestone-supporting-six-organizations-personally-selected-by-olympic-and-paralympic-athletes

 

The Easton Archery Center of Excellence receives award from the City of Chula Vista

Don Rabska, VP of the Easton Foundations with Mary Salas, the Mayor of Chula Vista
Don Rabska, VP of the Easton Foundations receives award from Mary Salas, the Mayor of Chula Vista

The City of Chula Vista recognizes the Easton Archery Center of Excellence with the Ribbons & Shovels New Non-Residential Construction Project Award for architecture and design excellence in commercial, industrial, or retail projects that contribute to the economic vitality of Chula Vista.

Easton, Thank You

girl-scouts-wyoming4Hello, Easton Sports Development Foundation.  I am writing to you with a huge “Thank you” for your support of the most successful camp season in the history of Girl Scouts of Montana & Wyoming (GSMW).  You are the reason we were able to host a record number of campers and you are the reason hundreds of girls are now eagerly pursuing archery and other outdoor ventures beyond our camps.

To prepare for our camps’ archery programs, GSMW certified one Level II and six new USAA Level I archery instructors and hired an international staff member with archery instruction certifications in Scotland.  GSMW hosted 522 residential campers during the summer of 2016 – almost 100 more than 2015’s enrollment.  Of our 522 campers, about 95% participated in at least 2 hours of archery instruction and activity.  Our campers each received a letter about the Easton Foundation’s generous equipment grant in addition to a list of ways for them to continue archery instruction throughout Montana and Wyoming.

After every camp session, we asked campers, “What was your favorite part of camp?”  Atop the list of favorite activities at camp was “Archery”!  Archery was followed closely by “making new friends.”  We believe archery and making friends go hand-in-hand.  Thank you so much for giving our staff and girls the opportunity to explore and share archery with others.

girl-scouts-wyoming

We already have plans to increase the capacity and magnitude of our archery programs in the coming camp seasons.  Due to the popularity of archery at our camps, next year, we will offer an archery-focused camp where each day girls will spend at least four hours on archery instruction and activity.  Our Casper, Wyoming camp, Camp Sacajawea, is within one mile of a BLM-managed archery range and field course, the Robert L. Adams Archery Range.  I look forward to working with the BLM and the local archery club, the Lost Arrow Archers, to develop intensive programming unique to our Girl Scouts camps.  From there, I know some of our campers will continue to participate and possibly compete in archery sports beyond the camp setting.

I have attached some of our best pictures of our campers using the awesome equipment the Easton Foundation granted us.  The girls loved the equipment, and so did their families and our instructors!  I know that at least half of our camp’s young instructors plan on pursuing archery recreationally outside of the camp setting, as well.

The Easton Sports Development Foundation has spurred a movement here in Montana and Wyoming.  You will see our archers growing up, enjoying archery, and competing through the ranks in the years to come.  We will update you on all our program developments throughout this year and further into the future.  Thank you once again for your generous support that has enlivened a love of archery in hundreds of girls across Montana and Wyoming.

Keeping Folks Hungry for Archery

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Story by Lisa Deaderick; Photo by Eduardo Contreras

Keaton Chia

 

 

 

 

 

Keaton Chia and his sister always wanted to try medieval sports like fencing, archery and jousting.   They were big fans of “Lord of the Rings” movies and local Scottish games that highlighted archery. “The skill and artistry required to master the bow and arrow fascinated us”, he recalls.     Read more….. 

 

LA84 Hosts 500 Young Athletes for Olympic Day 2016

Olympic DayFive hundred young athletes participated in Los Angeles’ Olympic Day 2016 celebration Thursday, hosted by the LA84 Foundation and LA 2024. Inside the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, the main site of the 1932 and 1984 Olympic Games, youth from across LA took part in nine Olympic and Paralympic sports while learning from Olympians, LA84 grantee programs, and local sport and adaptive programs. The event was cosponsored by Nike and the Foundation for Global Sports Development, and saw the participants take part in a celebratory ceremony and lighting of the Olympic flame before proceeding onto the Coliseum field to rotate through the sports stations. The ceremony featured LA84 President & CEO Renata Simril, LA 2024 Chairman Casey Wasserman, LA 2024 Vice Chair and Director of Athlete Relations Janet Evans and five children symbolizing each Olympic ring.

“LA84 was excited to provide young athletes in Southern California the opportunity to participate in and embrace a variety of sports during Olympic Day,” said Simril. “These youth can take the experiences and lessons of Olympic Day to empower themselves in all their endeavors. The spirit of the Olympic and Paralympic Games and the values they instill have provided countless young Americans with lifelong growth through the power of play, and this event continues that tradition.”

Archery, badminton, fencing, gymnastics, rowing, rugby, soccer, volleyball and Paralympic sitting volleyball were the nine sports set up inside the stadium. The youth also expressed their spirit by writing letters to Team USA athletes taking part in the Rio Olympic Games in August.

The celebration was a part of Olympic Day 2016, which saw a record-setting 2,120 events across the nation according to United States Olympic Committee projections. The event encouraged young athletes to promote the Olympic values of excellence, friendship and respect while carrying out the three pillars of Olympic Day: Move, Learn and Discover.

“It’s awesome to be here giving back to the kids,” said three-time Olympian in badminton Howard Bach, who led an on-field workshop. “Seeing the smiles on all the kids’ faces makes it worth every minute.”

The LA84 Foundation has proudly carried out the Olympic spirit, working in underserved communities to create equal opportunities in youth sports as a testament to the 1984 Games and Southern California’s commitment to Olympic sport.

“The Olympics are in LA’s DNA,” LA 2024 Chairman Casey Wasserman said. “Eighty-eight percent of Angelenos support bringing the Games back to the City of Angels in 2024. As a city and as the committee working to bring back the Games to the US for the first time in 28 years, we are thrilled to have had the opportunity to host the US flagship celebration of the Olympic Movement at the iconic LA Memorial Coliseum.”

“As a city with a ready-made connection to youth culture, Olympic Day is a unique opportunity to get a taste of what it means to inspire the next generation around the positive and powerful values of sport and Olympism,” LA 2024 Vice Chair and Director of Athlete Relations Janet Evans said.

About the LA84 Foundation

As a legacy of the 1984 Olympic Games, the LA84 Foundation continues to be a nationally recognized leader in support of youth sport programs and elevating the importance of sports in positive youth development. LA84 seeks to provide an opportunity for every child to participate in sports and experience the wide range of positive outcomes associated with youth sport participation. Since its launch in 1985, LA84 has invested millions in the communities that supported the Games, reaching more than 3 million youth throughout Southern California, from Santa Barbara to San Diego County. The LA84 Foundation continues to promote the spirit of the 1984 Olympic Games by convening and engaging local, national and international audiences about the role of sport in society, and the impact of the Olympic Games on host cities, especially as we look ahead to the 2024 Games.  LA84’s headquarters is located in the historic Britt House near downtown Los Angeles, where it houses meeting facilities and the world’s premier sports library. For more information, please visit www.la84.org.

Article reposted from LA84 press release June 24, 2016

The Easton Archery Center of Excellence is Officially Opened with a Spectacular Ribbon Shooting Ceremony

October 22, 2015San Diego, Calif.   The Easton Archery Center of Excellence, a state-of-the-art indoor archery training facility has officially opened with a spectacular “ribbon shooting” ceremony performed by 5 Olympic medalists from various Olympic Games, Juan Carlos Holgado ’92; Khatuna Lorig ‘92; Simon Fairweather ‘00; Vic Wunderle ‘00 and Aida Roman ‘12.

Olympic Medalists - Aida Roman, Vic Wunderle, Simon Fairweather, Juan Carlos Holgado and Khatuna Lorig
Olympic Medalists – Aida Roman, Vic Wunderle, Simon Fairweather, Juan Carlos Holgado and Khatuna Lorig

The Celebration featured a private VIP tour and luncheon for media and invited guests. While touring the elite complex guests met world-renowned Olympians, watched Olympic archers compete, tried their own skills at archery and enjoyed food and festivities.

Indoor RangeThe 42,629 square-foot facility includes a 70-meter indoor range, fitness room, athlete lounge, coaches’ offices and multiple classrooms and conference rooms. State-of-the-art technology includes ultra-high speed video, a 3D imaging system and other tools to assist Olympic athletes. A 30-bedroom housing complex is located nearby.

Greg Easton, President, Easton Foundations with his father Jim Easton
Greg Easton, President, Easton Foundations with his father Jim Easton

“Part of my vision to support the development of sports education and programs for youth and aspiring Olympians and Paralympians has included designing, building and supporting archery training facilities,” said Jim Easton. “The Easton Archery Center of Excellence is the culmination of years of planning and hard work by a team devoted to the goal of providing…leadership, facilities, programs, training and education for the growth and development of archery.”

Easton said the new center will be a place for “archers from around the world to pursue their competitive dreams.”

The building was designed by Easton’s brother Bob, who is a champion archer and also renowned architect.

Resident Athletes
Resident Athletes with USA National Coach, Kisik Lee; Easton Foundation Board Members – Greg Easton, Jim and Phyllis Easton, Don Rabska; Architect – Bob Easton and CEO of USA Archery – Denise Parker

The new center is expected to help California attract and host major archery events, including world championships.

“Archery has meant so much to the Easton family for over 90 years,” said Greg Easton, president of the family’s Easton Foundations. “Through the Easton Foundations, my father’s dream of supporting archery from the grassroots and community level all the way to high-end competitive archers is being realized.”

In 1939 the Easton family began developing and manufacturing aluminum arrows in Los Angeles. This was the beginning of a trend in materials that would change traditional archery and ultimately other sports.

In addition to the new center in Chula Vista, the foundation has developed archery centers in Van Nuys, Salt Lake City, Newberry, FL, and Yankton, SD, in the United States, as well as in Spain and Switzerland.