EASTON FOUNDATION IN THE NEWS

Little League International Mourns the Passing of Dr. Creighton J. Hale, Former Little League President and CEO

South Williamsport, Pa. (October XX, 2017) – Little League® International is deeply saddened to announce the passing of Dr. Creighton J. Hale, a titan of the youth sports industry, accomplished safety innovator, and former President and CEO of Little League International. Dr. Hale (1924-2017), served as Little League President from 1973 to 1994, and was appointed Chief Executive Officer in 1983.

“It was with great sadness that we received the news of the passing of Dr. Creighton Hale.  Dr. Hale was a personal friend, a great friend of Easton and everyone connected to baseball.  His contributions to the game will never be forgotten.”  Jim and Phyllis Easton

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Los Angeles Unveils State-Of-The-Art Archery Facility To Serve 2028 Olympics

News provided by
Los Angeles Parks Foundation
Sep 23, 2017, 14:39 ET

New $2 million range fulfills need for Los Angeles archery community and future Olympians. 

LOS ANGELES, Sept. 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks today unveiled a new, state-of-the-art archery range for the city’s archery enthusiasts and future Olympic athletes as L.A. prepares to host the Olympic Games in 2028. The Easton Rancho Park Archery Range underwent an extensive $2 million renovation to replace a smaller, outdated facility with soaring pavilions and four levels of shooting lanes.

LA City Mayor Garcetti showed off his archery skills at the Easton Ranch Park Archery Range.

“Los Angeles hit the bullseye when we landed the 2028 Olympic Games,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “The Easton Rancho Park Archery Range is part of an incredible legacy of world-class competition that brings opportunities for healthy recreation to Angelenos of all ages.”
City Councilman Paul Koretz, Department of Recreation and Parks General Manager Michael Shull, LA 2028 Chief Executive Officer Gene Sykes, Oscar-winning actress and champion archer Geena Davis, and Easton Sports Development Foundation founders Jim and Phyllis Easton joined Mayor Garcetti in celebrating the grand opening.
“On behalf of LA 2028, we are delighted to celebrate the grand opening of L.A.’s Easton Rancho Park Archery Range, which will provide Angelenos with increased access to a beloved Olympic and Paralympic sport,” said Gene Sykes, CEO of LA 2028. “Today’s grand opening underscores two of L.A.’s greatest strengths as an Olympic and Paralympic host city: our city’s wealth of world-class sports facilities and Angelenos’ passion and deep appreciation for sport.”  
The Easton Sports Development Foundation built the original archery range in 1983 as a practice facility for the 1984 Olympics. The new open-air structure now features 10m, 18m, 30m and 50m ranges; storage facilities; office space; and an equipment room to serve members of the public who are beginners as well as established clubs, enthusiasts, future Olympians and teams from UCLA and USC.
“The Easton Rancho Park Archery Range is a gift from the Easton Foundations to the City of Angels and the archery community,” said Jim Easton, chairman of Easton Sports Development Foundation and a U.S. representative to the International Olympic Committee. “This new facility is part of the continuing legacy that was envisioned during the 1984 Olympic Games to support the great sport of archery.” 
The project, which took nearly three years to complete, was spearheaded by Don Rabska, vice president of Easton Foundations. “The new range has a special symbolism, and was designed to be aesthetically pleasing and functional in support of those who pursue archery excellence,” said Rabska.
The new archery range is one of several projects achieved through a partnership between the Department of Recreation and Parks and the Los Angeles Parks Foundation. The Foundation has been supporting the city’s 50 Parks Initiative, an ambitious plan to acquire and transform parcels of land into new neighborhood parks. It is also helping to improve current parks and recreation programs, with the most recent accomplishment being the upgraded Easton Rancho Park Archery Range.
“This new state-of-the-art archery range represents the best example of public-private partnerships,” said Judith Kieffer, executive director of the Los Angeles Parks Foundation. “We’re proud to have worked with the Easton Sports Development Foundation and the parks department to bring this new amenity to the public.”
The Easton Rancho Park Archery Range is located at the Cheviot Hills Recreation Center and is available for public use, free of charge. Normal park hours are 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., seven days a week for those who bring their own equipment. Beginners’ classes and equipment are available on weekends on a first-come, first-serve basis.
For more information about the Los Angeles Parks Foundation, please visit www.laparksfoundation.org.  
About Easton Rancho Park Archery Range
Originally built in 1983 as a practice facility for the 1984 Olympics, the Easton Rancho Park Archery Range has undergone a massive three-year, $2 million renovation. Thanks to the work of the Easton Foundations, the Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks, and the Los Angeles Parks Foundation, the upgraded facility will serve the archery community and future Olympians as L.A. gears up to host the Olympics in 2028. Among the few public archery ranges in L.A., the range, which has 10m to 50m ranges, will serve archery enthusiasts and club teams throughout the area. The facility is free for the public, with beginners’ classes and equipment rentals available on weekends.
SOURCE Los Angeles Parks Foundation

Smart Partnerships Create Sustainable Market for ATA Members

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ATA and the Easton Foundations partnered with USA Archery in 2011 to create an Outreach program that became a self-sufficient, sustainable success in three years. The program includes Explore Archery, an educational program that introduces beginners of all ages and abilities to archery. Read more….

Photo Credit: USA Archery

Florida Sports Foundation awards Easton Gator Cup Best Mid-Market Event of the Year for 2016

The Florida Sports Foundation (FSF), the state’s leading sports promotion and development organization, presented six awards to recognize Florida communities and sports commissions for their outstanding efforts in sports tourism in the State of Florida.  The events were awarded or held between April 1, 2016 and April 15, 2017.

Mid-Market Event of the Year:  Easton Gator Cup, Newberry, Gainesville Sports Commission.

While this is an annual local created event, what made the 2016 event special was winning the bid to host the USA Olympic Team Trials as the last chance for men and women to qualify in the US to go to the 2016 Olympics in Rio.   During the Olympic Trials the top 8 men and women were eliminated down to the top 4, a 3 person team with one alternate archer.  This was not only great marketing for the local community but also for the State of Florida to host an Olympic Qualifier before Rio.  Over 600 people attended the five-day Gator Cup Tournament and Olympic Team Trial.  Over 80% of participants were from out-of-state and over 95% of participants were from out-of county with 38 states represented and archers from Canada, Trinidad and Bermuda.  1,138 room nights were produced with over $175,000 direct hotel impact and a direct Economic impact of $452,067.

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https://www.facebook.com/FloridaSportsFoundation/posts/1399603640093019

Top Ranked Compound Bow Archer Sets Sights On Recurve For 2020 Olympics

By: Perry Smith

Crystal Gauvin had a successful career she enjoyed as a senior economist, and then she discovered archery.

Her story contains a combination of factors—parts dedication, drive, passion, planning, practice, and sacrifice—as her voyage to the No. 2 ranked archer in the world (No. 1 in the United States), includes her forgoing the steady career, for a shot at being right where she stands today. And when she reached the top of the compound bow world, she changed again.

Crystal received her first compound bow as a Christmas present in 2012, but even that’s a bit of an unusual start for a world class competitor. At first, her family and friends discouraged the choice, and pushed her toward the recurve bow. “They wouldn’t let me shoot with a compound bow,” she recalled. “Here in New England, because of (five-time Olympian) Butch Johnson, it was all recurve, recurve, recurve. Nobody shoots compound.”

She made a bet with her husband and some of her friends from the local archery range—if she entered a local competition and won, she could shoot all the compound bow she desired. Using an old hunting bow sans the stabilizer and target sights commonplace in competitions, she took first. In fact, she won by about 100 points.

The family’s hesitation was understandable. Hailing from the Northeast, a region that produced Olympians and renowned coaches, including Butch Johnson, Roxanne Reimann and Karen Scavotto among others, considered to be among the best in recurve, Gauvin’s choice is all the more unique. Most archers in the area shoot with a recurve, which Gauvin attributed to a few factors, namely the large shadows cast by the success of the aforementioned greats. But her family became staunch supporters, and with her yuletide gift of a target bow, she was ready. Or so she thought.  “And I kind of just took off, from there,” she said, “and got my butt handed to me at the Lancaster Classic.”

Her first “real” tournament—the Pennsylvania competition in late January 2013 that, over the last quarter-century, brings together some of the best archers in the world—gave her an education in how much she had to learn, she said. For example, her finishing out of the top-16 for the first time ended up being a blessing in disguise—she hadn’t brought enough arrows to compete had she made the cut. “Make sure you read the rules for every archery tournament,” she said, sharing the lesson that the experience taught her. “Every tournament can have a different format.”

The loss became a turning point for her. The early elimination kindled her competitive nature.

She was shooting alongside some of the nation’s best, and started to soak up all she could: the importance of knowing how to fix problems with your equipment, the need for consistent training, and so on. By the end of the year, she set her sights on making the national team in 2014. After the first year, she ended up on the podium at more than two-thirds of her tournaments in 2014, and then the following year, she earned a spot on the U.S. World Cup team.

“There’s definitely a big learning curve,” she said, noting things like the first time she shot outdoors, for the Arizona Cup, early in the season, and how wind could affect her shot.

All of this and others were teaching moments that she still takes with her, and shares with the athletes she coaches.

Despite her success, the industry and Olympic opportunity with the recurve bow recently pushed her to pick up the more traditional competition bow, and she’s now set her sights, so to speak, on the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. This year, her goal is a learning year, albeit one with aggressive goals, as she gets the hang of recurve.

For the athlete who was essentially oblivious to international archery competition until the London Olympics—she said she trained under Butch Johnson for months before discovering his Olympic past—Gauvin is now clearly in the same league as archery’s best. And while she knows the leap from competitive to elite is difficult, it would probably be unwise to bet against her at this point.  “Ultimately, the primary goal is to learn as much as I can so I can be 100 percent ready to be competitive for next year,” she said.